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Mirwart Castle

Description

This fortified building has long retained a modest appearance. In the course of its existence, it has also had a very eventful history. Construction and reconstruction followed one another until the current building was rebuilt on the ruins of the medieval estate between 1706 and 1734. In the course of seven centuries, this defence system suffered many setbacks.The famous cantatorium, the chronicle of the abbey of Saint-Hubert, tells us that in 955, a castle was founded on the banks of the river Lhomme, two miles from Saint-Hubert, by a lord from Lorraine. He wanted to protect himself against his enemies, the lords of Bouillon and Orchimont. Later, the lords came into conflict with the monks of Saint-Hubert and were driven out by the Prince-Bishop of Liège, Henry I of Verdun, who defended the monks. The abbot of Saint-Hubert even had the fortress dismantled in 1083.The next Prince-Bishop, Otbert, rebuilt the castle and transferred it to Bovon de Waha in 1099. In the 13th century, a new dispute over the domain broke out. The fief was bought by Jean d'Avesne, but the prince-bishop rejected the new owner. This led to a conflict between the Prince-Bishop (Jan van Sponheim) and the Counts of Hainaut, Luxembourg, Namur and Looz, as well as the Duke of Brabant. The castle changed hands several times before falling back to Adolphe de La Marck (prince-bishop). In the 17th century, the castle witnessed the wars between France and Spain and then between France and Austria. In the 18th century, the period is quieter and the domain gets its current appearance. In the 19th century, several families succeeded each other in Mirwart: the founder of the Vonêche crystal factory, Aimé-Gabriel d'Artigues, the Van Der Lindens of Hoogvorst, the d'Arrigades and the Von Der Beckes.In 1951, it became provincial property, but was gradually abandoned to the delight of looters. A few years ago, a Dutchman, Mr Tijs Blom, the owner of Hargimont castle, bought it to renovate it. This beautiful building is not accessible to the public. The owner has recently started restoration work to bring it back to its former glory.

Description

This fortified building has long retained a modest appearance. In the course of its existence, it has also had a very eventful history. Construction and reconstruction followed one another until the current building was rebuilt on the ruins of the medieval estate between 1706 and 1734. In the course of seven centuries, this defence system suffered many setbacks.The famous cantatorium, the chronicle of the abbey of Saint-Hubert, tells us that in 955, a castle was founded on the banks of the river Lhomme, two miles from Saint-Hubert, by a lord from Lorraine. He wanted to protect himself against his enemies, the lords of Bouillon and Orchimont. Later, the lords came into conflict with the monks of Saint-Hubert and were driven out by the Prince-Bishop of Liège, Henry I of Verdun, who defended the monks. The abbot of Saint-Hubert even had the fortress dismantled in 1083.The next Prince-Bishop, Otbert, rebuilt the castle and transferred it to Bovon de Waha in 1099. In the 13th century, a new dispute over the domain broke out. The fief was bought by Jean d'Avesne, but the prince-bishop rejected the new owner. This led to a conflict between the Prince-Bishop (Jan van Sponheim) and the Counts of Hainaut, Luxembourg, Namur and Looz, as well as the Duke of Brabant. The castle changed hands several times before falling back to Adolphe de La Marck (prince-bishop). In the 17th century, the castle witnessed the wars between France and Spain and then between France and Austria. In the 18th century, the period is quieter and the domain gets its current appearance. In the 19th century, several families succeeded each other in Mirwart: the founder of the Vonêche crystal factory, Aimé-Gabriel d'Artigues, the Van Der Lindens of Hoogvorst, the d'Arrigades and the Von Der Beckes.In 1951, it became provincial property, but was gradually abandoned to the delight of looters. A few years ago, a Dutchman, Mr Tijs Blom, the owner of Hargimont castle, bought it to renovate it. This beautiful building is not accessible to the public. The owner has recently started restoration work to bring it back to its former glory.

Extra infos

  • French

Contact

Mirwart Castle

    • rue du Château,
    • 6870 Mirwart
    • Belgique
    • 50.0563
    • 5.26347

    Language(s)

    • French

    Visit

    • French

    Themes

    • Rating No rating
    • Built heritage
    • Castle
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